VT100 terminal emulation software

The Video Terminal 100 (VT100) is a terminal that was produced by Digital Equipment Corporation (DEC). It was first released in 1978 as a successor to DEC’s previous VT50 and VT52 terminals.

Both HyperTerminal and HyperACCESS include support for VT52 terminal emulation, which allows the software to be used to connect your computer to devices and systems that would normally require a DEC VT52 terminal.

The VT100 emulator translates escape sequences from the system you are connecting to and uses them to control the terminal screen. Additionally the emulator maps the keyboard to send VT100 escape sequences when certain keys are pressed.

The default arrow and function key mappings for the VT100 emulator are listed below. If needed these can be overridden using the Key Macro functionality.

Key Sequence
up <esc>[A
down <esc>[B
right <esc>[C
left <esc>[D
F1 <esc>OP
F2 <esc>OQ
F3 <esc>OR
F4 <esc>OS

VT220 VT320 terminal emulation software

The Video Terminal 220 (VT220) is a terminal that was produced by Digital Equipment Corporation (DEC). It was first released in 1983 as a successor to DEC’s previous VT100 series terminals.
The VT320 was released released a few years later in 1987.

Both HyperTerminal and HyperACCESS include support for VT220 and VT320 terminal emulation, which allows the software to be used to connect your computer to devices and systems that would normally require a one of these terminals.

The terminal emulator translates escape sequences from the system you are connecting to and uses them to control the terminal screen. Additionally the emulator maps the keyboard to send VT220 or VT320 escape sequences when certain keys are pressed.

The default arrow and function key mappings for the VT220 and VT320 emulators are listed below. If needed these can be overridden using the Key Macro functionality.

Key Sequence
up <esc>[A
down <esc>[B
right <esc>[C
left <esc>[D
F1 <esc>OP
F2 <esc>OQ
F3 <esc>OR
F4 <esc>OS
F5
F6 <esc>[17~
F7 <esc>[18~
F8 <esc>[19~
F9 <esc>[20~
F10 <esc>[21~
F11
F12
ctrl+F1 <esc>[23~
ctrl+F2 <esc>[24~
ctrl+F3 <esc>[25~
ctrl+F4 <esc>[26~
ctrl+F5 <esc>[28~
ctrl+F6 <esc>[29~
ctrl+F7 <esc>[31~
ctrl+F8 <esc>[32~
ctrl+F9 <esc>[33~
ctrl+F10

VT52 Terminal Emulation Software

The Video Terminal 52 (VT52) is a terminal that was produced by Digital Equipment Corporation (DEC). It was first released in 1975 as a successor to DEC’s previous VT50 terminal.

Both HyperTerminal and HyperACCESS include support for VT52 terminal emulation, which allows the software to be used to connect your computer to devices and systems that would normally require a DEC VT100 series terminal.

The emulator translates escape sequences from the system you are connecting to and uses them to control the terminal screen. Additionally the emulator maps the keyboard to send VT52 escape sequences when certain keys are pressed.

The default arrow and function key mappings for the VT52 emulator are listed below. If needed these can be overridden using the Key Macro functionality.

Key Sequence
up <esc>A
down <esc>B
right <esc>C
left <esc>D
F1 <esc>P
F2 <esc>Q
F3 <esc>R
F4 <esc>S

What is HyperTerminal?

What is HyperTerminal?

HyperTerminal is our terminal emulation software for Windows. It was originally developed as a ‘lite’ version of our HyperACCESS program, and was licensed by Microsoft to include with Windows 95 up through Windows XP. This was discontinued when Microsoft released Windows Vista. We have continued to update the software since then, and the current version of HyperTerminal Private Edition is compatible with all the latest versions of Windows.

What is HyperTerminal used for?

HyperTerminal can be used for a wide variety of purposes. It is often used to connect to computer and networking equipment, phone systems, medical billing systems, medical and lab equipment, industrial equipment, radio transmitters and receivers, heating and cooling and other building maintenance systems, and many others.

How does HyperTerminal work?

HyperTerminal supports text-based communication through Telnet, SSH, Modem, and Serial port connections. The software receives data through the connection, and processes the data through a terminal emulator that is designed to mimic different types of terminal systems. The terminal emulator processes control codes and decides where and how that data is displayed on the terminal screen, and also allows control codes to be sent back to the system as needed.

.ht file extension

What is an ht file?

.ht is the file extension used for HyperTerminal session files. These files store your connection and terminal emulator settings as well as any Key Macros or file transfer settings you have set up.

The ht file is created automatically when you set up a connection in HyperTerminal. By default it is saved into the “HyperTerminal Connections” folder in your start menu under Start->All Programs->HyperTerminal Private Edition->HyperTerminal Connections. You can also open your session files by clicking File->Open in HyperTerminal and selecting the file you want to open.

If you would like to create a desktop shortcut to open your session file directly click File->Open, then right click on the session file, and select Send To->Desktop.

How to use HyperTerminal as a Serial Port Monitor

To use HyperTerminal as a serial port monitor or dumb terminal

  1. Connect the system you are monitoring to the serial port.
  2. Open the HyperTerminal Software and create a new connection.
  3. Enter a name for your connection and click OK.
  4. Select your COM port under “connect using”.
  5. Click Configure, and make sure that the port settings match those required by the system you are connecting to. Click OK.
  6. Click OK again to connect. Once connected you should see the text as it is received by the serial port.
  7. If you need to capture non-text data as well you can do this by clicking Transfer, Capture Text, Start.

No Automation or Scripting Support in HyperTerminal or HTPE

Q – I would like to know if HyperTerminal can execute several commands in sequence using some sort of scripting. Is there a way to automate tasks in HyperTerminal?

A – Neither HyperTerminal nor HyperTerminal Private Edition supports scripting. However, HyperACCESS, the commercial upgrade product for HyperTerminal and HTPE, does include a full API of communication functions that would allow you to script an entire communication session. You can use either the automated script recorder, accessible through the File menu, or create custom scripts with our powerful API which is Active X and OLE compliant. Our API functions can be incorporated within external programs, such as VBA.

You can preview HyperACCESS by downloading the Trial copy from HyperACCESS Trial. It is fully functional and the settings are saved. The file is H32TRIAL.EXE. Double-click the file to run the installation program. The evaluation period is 15 days.

You can also download the user’s and API manuals from this location. Both reference guides can be very helpful during the evaluation period.

Unable to open COMX

“Unable to open com port COMX”

This message occurs when HyperTerminal Private Edition attempts to use a communications port, either for a modem connection or a direct cabled connection, but receives an error report from the Windows operating system. The Windows TAPI device may not be functioning properly.

To initiate a connection, HTPE makes a programming request through Windows TAPI, Telephony Application Programming Interface, to the attached device. TAPI is the intermediary between software applications that need the use of communications hardware devices. A communications software, such as HTPE, requests Windows TAPI to open the designated serial port, send commands to the device, then pass control of the device back to the application that requested its use. This occurs when a successful connection has been established. In this case, Windows was unable to access and open the selected communications port. It could not open the desired port and reported the failure to HTPE, which displayed the message listed above.

This is a hardware/operating system issue that is resolved through either:

Removing the device and reinstalling it through Device Manager in the Systems icon in Control Panel; or

Reinstalling Windows TAPI from your installation CD.

Automatically Starting HyperTerminal Private Edition

Q – I want to start HyperTerminal Private Edition from an application I have written and automatically launch a connection. What syntax do I need to use?

A – The process you describe requires scripting with an Application Programming Interface (API)
specific to the software application. Neither HyperTerminal nor HyperTerminal Private Edition support scripting. However, HyperACCESS, the commercial upgrade product from HyperTerminal and HyperTerminal Private Edition, does include a full API of communication functions that would allow you to script an entire communication session. You can use either the automated script recorder or create custom scripts with our powerful API which is Active X and OLE compliant. You can then use our API functions within external programs, such as VB.

You can preview the latest version of HyperACCESS by downloading a 15-day trial copy from /hyperaccess-trial/ It is fully functional and the settings are saved. The file is H32TRIAL.EXE. Double-click the file to run the installation program.

You can also download the User’s and API manuals from our manuals page. These reference manuals contain information that can be helpful during the evaluation period.

Deleting Characters from Terminal Screen

Deleting Characters from Terminal Screen

Q – Why can’t I delete characters from the terminal screen?

A – The host you are connected to has control of the characters displayed on your terminal screen. The host is expecting the cursor to be at particular positions on the screen based on the data that it has already sent to the screen. If you alter that screen locally, you potentially disrupt the interaction between you and your host in ways that the host can’t predict or control. That’s why you can’t delete characters from the screen. By the way, the same thing is true of most clients displaying information from servers. For example, you’ll find that you can’t delete characters on Netscape Navigator or Microsoft’s Internet Explorer.

Hilgraeve